That’s a bold statement, but this is exactly the feeling of many fighter pilots as they take on the role and the seat of the jet fighter. Surely, it was said the same of the F-15, the JSF, but apparently they all conclude that the F-22 Raptor is definitely the best flying machine ever buit. See the testimony of Kevin Robbins. Col. Kevin Robbins still remembers the first time he saw the F-22 Raptor. He was driving near the flightline at Langley Air Force Base, Va., when he heard a load roar and saw a plane streak across his field of vision and start performing several aerial maneuvers. He stopped the car, got out and stared in amazement. An F-15 Eagle pilot himself, the colonel couldn’t believe what he was seeing. “This plane was doing things that shouldn’t be possible in a jet,” he said. “I just kept thinking that if anyone tried that in any other plane, he’d be dead.” The colonel wasn’t sure how the plane was able to do the things in the air that he was witnessing, but he couldn’t wait to find out. He applied for and was accepted to the F-22 program soon after. Today, he not only flies the jet, but also leads as commander of the 1st Fighter Wing at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va. Nearly a decade later, the F-22 still amazes him. The plane, a modern marvel of technology that’s a far cry from anything Robbins ever imagined flying, exceeds his expectations every time he gets in the cockpit. Even now, the colonel has a hard time believing he gets paid to fly the stealth jet. “This plane is a game-changer,” he said. “It’s a cut above anything else out there, and its capabilities are simply amazing.” Robbins felt this way right from the start. He still remembers his first Raptor flight, which he performed solo, because there isn’t a two-seat Raptor trainer. “On the ground, it feels like a muscle car,” he said. “It feels all clunky, but you can feel the power just waiting to be released. Then, once you punch it and head into the air, it’s like a Ferrari with pure speed.” To read on fly fighter jet.

It was supposed to be Boeing’s leap into the future, the 787 Dreamliner is actually the leap to the ground as the The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has grounded the Boeing 787 Dreamliner due to the mounting evidence of problems with the aircraft’s lithium battery sub-system. These problems have had serious consequences with the aircraft. The move follows an earlier announcement by the agency of a review of the Dreamliner’s safety, design and the certification process that lead to its approval for air carrier operations. The FAA said, “As a result of an in-flight, Boeing 787 battery incident earlier today in Japan, the FAA will issue an emergency airworthiness directive to address a potential battery fire risk in the 787 and require operators to temporarily cease operations. Before further flight, operators of U.S.-registered, Boeing 787 aircraft must demonstrate to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) that the batteries are safe.” We remember about 15 years ago when Boeing used social media, emails and a great website to ask people to give their opinion about what should be the Dreamliner. We all took part and gave our ideas, probably this is one of the reasons we are so attached to the aircraft, despite of the problems that we call glitches. The FAA will work with the manufacturer and carriers to develop a corrective action plan to allow the U.S. 787 fleet to resume operations as quickly and safely as possible, says the FAA. Boeing is committed to supporting the FAA and finding answers as quickly as possible. The company is working around the clock with its customers and the various regulatory and investigative authorities. Boeing will make available the entire resources of The Boeing Company to assist. One of the key aspect swill be of course financial. How much the airlines will ask Boeing to pay for the planes that are grounded.

Russia’s fifth-generation stealth jet fighter, the T-50, will start state flight tests in March 2013, Russia’s Air Force Commander, Lt. Gen. Viktor Bondarev said on Sunday. Currently three fighter jets are performing test flights at the Zhukovsky airfield outside Moscow, the fourth plane is undergoing factory test trials and the fifth plane is in the process of factory approvals, the commander said. All these planes will fly to Akhtubinsk in the Astrakhan Region in March next year where “state tests will begin,” he said. There will be a total of eight planes involved in state trials in Akhtubinsk throughout 2013, the commander said. “We’ll complete them [the tests] within 2-2.5 years and somewhere in 2015-early 2016 these planes are expected to go into serial production and we’ll start receiving them and supplying our combat units with them,” the commander said. The Sukhoi aircraft company, the T-50 maker, announced last week that Russia’s fourth prototype Sukhoi T-50 stealth fighter jet took to the skies for the first time in a 40 minute flight at the Komsomolsk-on-Amur factory in Siberia. The T-50, also known as project PAK-FA, first flew in January 2010 and was first publicly revealed at the Moscow Air Show in 2011. The T-50, which will be the core of Russia’s future fighter fleet, is a fifth-generation multirole fighter aircraft featuring low-observable technology (stealth), super-maneuverability, supercruise capability (supersonic flight without use of afterburner), and an advanced avionics suite including an X-band active phased-array radar. The Russian Defense Ministry plans to purchase a first batch of 10 evaluation aircraft and then 60 production-standard aircraft after 2015.