You may have seen some images of the exercise in some blogs and specialized press, but a recent event occurred in South Korea. The military exercise is design to improve cooperation between US and South Korean forces. As part of the exercise is a bombing training. And for this the U.S. Strategic Command officials sent two B-2 Spirit bombers for a long-duration, round-trip training mission from Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., to South Korea March 28 as part of the ongoing bilateral Foal Eagle training exercise. The exercise demonstrates the commitment of the United States and its capability to defend South Korea and to provide extended deterrence to our allies in the Asia-Pacific region. This mission by two B-2 Spirit bombers assigned to 509th Bomb Wing, which demonstrates the United States’ ability to conduct long range, precision strikes quickly and at will, involved flying more than 6,500 miles to the Korean Peninsula, dropping inert munitions on the Jik Do Range, and returning to the continental U.S. in a single, continuous mission. The United States is steadfast in its alliance commitment to the defense of South Korea, to deterring aggression, and to ensuring peace and stability in the region. The B-2 bomber is an important element of America’s enduring and robust extended deterrence capability in the Asia-Pacific region. It always strikes me as impressive that a bomber pilot will arrive at the base near his home in the US, prepare the mission, fly around the world, drop the load without even being seen as the B-2 is stealthy, and return home later that night to have dinner with the family. Technology has transformed radically the way we approach the perception of a conflict.

B-2 bomber

Our L-39 is getting “pinked”

Our L-39 Albatros is getting “pinked”! That’s a funny colour for a jet fighter… All this is for an advert to be shown soon, and that’s a surprise so we won’t say too much about it, except the brand’s colour is a bit pinkish. Therefore the aircraft has been redecorated to match the colours. We are often asked to rent the jet fighter for TV commercials, scenes in movies, and it’s always a pleasure to do that. It’s fun to see our aircraft then in adverts or movies. This jet fighter is located in Paris, and you can come and fly with us. Fly the L39 Albatros fighter jet in Paris. The L39 Albatros is a jet that will deliver all the sensations of a fighter pilot as it is used for training in many air forces around the world. Ideal to try out evolutions such as barrels and tactical flying, you will enjoy this unique jet fighter ride so close to Paris, in France. Your pilots are all highly trained and qualified, one of them even being a key member of the Patrouille de France, the national air display team. Get suited up and ready for a fighter jet flight that you will never forget. Your jet fighter pilots are highly skilled and qualified. They have logged many hours flying. One of them is even a key member of the Patrouille de France, the national air display team. They like to share their passion and always fly to your G tolerance in order to make this jet fighter ride a once in a lifetime experience.

l-39 jet fighter

Red Flag 2013 is go

The international aerial and strategic event Red Flag is go for 2013. The event has been launched by the 79th Fighter Squadron, the ‘Tigers’ as they launched eight F-16 Fighting Falcons during a day and night time mission to kickoff the event. Red Flag is an advanced aerial combat training exercise hosted at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada and Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, the latter location being known as Red Flag – Alaska and being a successor to the previous COPE THUNDER exercise series. Since 1975, air crews from the United States Air Force(USAF) and other U.S. military branches and allies take part in one of several Red Flag exercises held during the year, each of which is two weeks in duration. The Red Flag exercises, conducted in four to six cycles a year by the 414th Combat Training Squadron of the 57th Wing, are very realistic aerial war games. The purpose is to train pilots from the U.S., NATO and other allied countries for real combat situations. This includes the use of “enemy” hardware and live ammunition for bombing exercises within the Nevada Test and Training Range. The 79th FS, commanded by Lt. Col. Jason Plourde, led members of his unit from takeoff to landing as the exercise kicked off . The unit out of Shaw AFB, S.C., has approximately 15 F-16 Fighting Falcons on the ground here and 35 pilots slated to fly throughout the three-week long exercise. As Red Flag gets underway, Plourde plans to ensure the men and women of his unit train hard and meet quite a few set objectives. While members of the 79th FS conduct similar types of training at Shaw, Red Flag offers a more vast and more challenging environment to train in, Plourde explained. The mission of the 414th Combat Training Squadron (Red Flag) is to maximize the combat readiness and survivability of participants by providing a realistic training environment and a forum that encourages a free exchange of ideas. To accomplish this, combat units from the United States and its allied countries engage in realistic combat training scenarios carefully conducted within the Nellis Range Complex. The Nellis Range complex is located northwest of Las Vegas and covers an area of 60 nautical miles (111 km) by 100 nautical miles (190 km), approximately half the area of Switzerland. This space allows the exercises to be on a very large scale. The missions conducted during the first day were challenging but 79th pilots feel they will provide plenty of opportunity for lessons learned, explained Capt. Ryan Miller, 79th weapons officer.

It was the talk of the month, when the F-35 lightning II was grounded because of cracked blade. Now the grounding has been lifted, and it seems this is good news. The Defense Department lifted its grounding of the F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter after analysis concluded that a cracked turbine blade in an engine on a single plane resulted from overuse in test operations, according to an official with the F-35 Joint Program Office. In an email statement, the official, Kyra Hawn, said engineers have so far discovered no other cracks in inspections of the other engines, and no engine redesign was needed. “This decision concludes a cautionary flight suspension that began on Feb. 21 after a 0.6-inch crack was found on a third stage turbine blade of a test aircraft at the Edwards Air Force Base, (Calif.,) F-35 Integrated Test Facility during a routine inspection,” Hawn said. The blade also underwent comprehensive tests at the Pratt and Whitney facility in Middletown, Conn., she added. The engine in question, she explained, is part of the F-35 test aircraft fleet and had been operated for extended time in the high-temperature environment in its mission to expand the F-35 flight envelope. “Prolonged exposure to high levels of heat and other operational stressors on this specific engine were determined to be the cause of the crack,” Hawn said. Within the current DOD inventory, 17 F-35s are employed in test and development at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, Md., and Edwards Air Force Base. The remaining aircraft are assigned to Eglin Air Force Base, Fla, and Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., and comprise the initial F-35 training fleet. The problem remains quite serious though. This problem is causing a serious impact on the entire US army as all aircrafts are grounded. Fortunately, the F-35 is still undergoing testing, but this demonstrates how an incident or flaw could potentially ground an entire fleet. As aircrafts are designed to the needs of each air force in a same mold, a flaw could potentially damage the entire aerial force. This is quite serious. And the timing is not good either, after China announced the development of its own jet fighter, but more importantly purchasing Sukhoi jet fighters, which apparently do not have a problem. There is a noticeable trend here that tech, and power that goes with it, is shifting to the East.